Do Masks and Social Distancing Work? Not According to the CDC.

In its latest bulletin, the CDC claimed that SARS-CoV-2 is transmitted by aerosol. The CDC updated its coronavirus website on Friday, saying COVID-19 can commonly spread, “through respiratory droplets or small particles, such as those in aerosols, produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, sings, talks, or breathes.” (Well, for sure we can’t stop breathing if that’ll be the next CDC recommendation.)

This admission in effect destroys the argument that people should wear masks or even socially distance. It’s documented that masks are unable to filter small particles. For example, even in the case of a properly fitted N95 mask, tiny particle smaller than 0.3 µm can still permeate the mask and cloth masks are far more permeable. As this article explains, airborne particles can travel long distances and reach those not in the immediate vicinity of the aerosol release.

There is growing evidence that droplets and airborne particles can remain suspended in the air as they travel distances far beyond six feet. Choir practice, indoor restaurants and fitness classes are all examples of activities where participants standing more than six feel away can still inhale airborne particles. In general, indoor environments without good ventilation increase this risk, according to the CDC’s new guidance. 

But we wouldn’t be called The Politics of Duh if we simply took the CDC’s reporting at face value. So, without further ado, let’s dive in: Because the particles are traveling via aerosol transmission, there really is no good determination for exactly how far they could travel.

This realization would explain why mask-wearing, social distancing and quarantining were extremely ineffective in many countries against the spread of COVID-19. Belgium, for instance, had one of the strictest quarantines and extremely stringent rules regarding the use of masks and yet, the country has the second-highest mortality rate in the world.

In contrast, we have the Swedish model, well-known for minimal use of masks, lax social distancing policies and a general penchant to keep its economy open. At this point, Sweden has reported few new actual cases and almost no new deaths. It should be noted that many of the “new cases” in Sweden (at least 3,700) there were false positives because of a faulty Chinese-supplied COVID-19 test created by BGI Genomics. The faulty test skewed the death counts; if a person died 30 to 60 days after a positive test for COVID-19 was administered, authorities recorded it as a COVID-19 death regardless of the underlying conditions. So, if the test produced a false positive for COVID-19, it follows that the death was also wrongly recorded.

And let’s pause for a minute and examine the worthiness of BGI Genomics. This company has produced 35 million test kits approved for sale in more than 50 countries, including the USA. Given its widespread distribution and Sweden contesting the test’s validity, can we really consider the death counts in all countries to be accurate?

Put together, it looks like we’ve got ourselves a pretty toxic brew muddying the already-muddled COVID-19 waters. The admission by the CDC that the virus is airborne basically renders masks futile because it means they’ll have minimal impact on transmission, as will six-foot social distancing rules. Add in the fact that BGI has supplied 35 million test kits and you really throw the COVID-19 story for a loop.

Today, (and not surprisingly) the CDC announced the organization will be modifying its statements about aerosol transmission because they were allegedly published in error. This reminds me of the recent admission by the CDC that only 6% of the deaths in the United States were actually due to COVID-19 alone. The new statement about aerosol transmission is equally damaging to the credibility of the CDC. If it’s true, it would be utterly damaging to the CDC’s narrative about social distancing and mask use. Is the CDC so poorly run that statements are not scrutinized or approved by panels of professionals within the organization before release? It all sounds very suspicious and either CDC employees are completely and consistently incompetent or someone released damaging information. Now the CDC is attempting to put the genie back in the bottle. But truth, as we know, cannot be contained, and it’s only a matter of time before it becomes unmasked.

3 thoughts on “Do Masks and Social Distancing Work? Not According to the CDC.

  1. Pale rider

    Truth has become mob rule. Opinions based in fear, nothing more. Common sense says our government is up to something evil, but smear on a butt load of guilt and you have mob rule compliance.
    I don’t need CDC to tell me a mask is ridiculous, take it off and you’ll see for yourself, they are a joke on the world.

    Like

  2. The CDC can’t handle the truth, even when they are the ones who try to speak it. They contradict themselves to protect a horribly flawed paradigm and narrative a little bit longer.

    Intelligent people, however, are onto them and know that they are a bunch of clown doctors trying to keep their pathetic show afloat.

    Like

  3. alias91376267

    Criminal communism appeals to those who will never progress to accepting the scientific method, preferring the ‘potty potty caa caa’ approach to logical understanding. If their mothers did not teach it to them, it is worthless noise and a corruption of the soul. I pity the fools. Rome was not built in a day, and neither are geniuses. “Read it again until you understand it,” are good words to live by. ” If you do not do your homework, you will flunk.” are more good words.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s