Do Masks and Social Distancing Work? Not According to the CDC.

In its latest bulletin, the CDC claimed that SARS-CoV-2 is transmitted by aerosol. The CDC updated its coronavirus website on Friday, saying COVID-19 can commonly spread, “through respiratory droplets or small particles, such as those in aerosols, produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, sings, talks, or breathes.” (Well, for sure we can’t stop breathing if that’ll be the next CDC recommendation.)

This admission in effect destroys the argument that people should wear masks or even socially distance. It’s documented that masks are unable to filter small particles. For example, even in the case of a properly fitted N95 mask, tiny particle smaller than 0.3 µm can still permeate the mask and cloth masks are far more permeable. As this article explains, airborne particles can travel long distances and reach those not in the immediate vicinity of the aerosol release.

There is growing evidence that droplets and airborne particles can remain suspended in the air as they travel distances far beyond six feet. Choir practice, indoor restaurants and fitness classes are all examples of activities where participants standing more than six feel away can still inhale airborne particles. In general, indoor environments without good ventilation increase this risk, according to the CDC’s new guidance. 

But we wouldn’t be called The Politics of Duh if we simply took the CDC’s reporting at face value. So, without further ado, let’s dive in: Because the particles are traveling via aerosol transmission, there really is no good determination for exactly how far they could travel.

This realization would explain why mask-wearing, social distancing and quarantining were extremely ineffective in many countries against the spread of COVID-19. Belgium, for instance, had one of the strictest quarantines and extremely stringent rules regarding the use of masks and yet, the country has the second-highest mortality rate in the world.

In contrast, we have the Swedish model, well-known for minimal use of masks, lax social distancing policies and a general penchant to keep its economy open. At this point, Sweden has reported few new actual cases and almost no new deaths. It should be noted that many of the “new cases” in Sweden (at least 3,700) there were false positives because of a faulty Chinese-supplied COVID-19 test created by BGI Genomics. The faulty test skewed the death counts; if a person died 30 to 60 days after a positive test for COVID-19 was administered, authorities recorded it as a COVID-19 death regardless of the underlying conditions. So, if the test produced a false positive for COVID-19, it follows that the death was also wrongly recorded.

And let’s pause for a minute and examine the worthiness of BGI Genomics. This company has produced 35 million test kits approved for sale in more than 50 countries, including the USA. Given its widespread distribution and Sweden contesting the test’s validity, can we really consider the death counts in all countries to be accurate?

Put together, it looks like we’ve got ourselves a pretty toxic brew muddying the already-muddled COVID-19 waters. The admission by the CDC that the virus is airborne basically renders masks futile because it means they’ll have minimal impact on transmission, as will six-foot social distancing rules. Add in the fact that BGI has supplied 35 million test kits and you really throw the COVID-19 story for a loop.

Today, (and not surprisingly) the CDC announced the organization will be modifying its statements about aerosol transmission because they were allegedly published in error. This reminds me of the recent admission by the CDC that only 6% of the deaths in the United States were actually due to COVID-19 alone. The new statement about aerosol transmission is equally damaging to the credibility of the CDC. If it’s true, it would be utterly damaging to the CDC’s narrative about social distancing and mask use. Is the CDC so poorly run that statements are not scrutinized or approved by panels of professionals within the organization before release? It all sounds very suspicious and either CDC employees are completely and consistently incompetent or someone released damaging information. Now the CDC is attempting to put the genie back in the bottle. But truth, as we know, cannot be contained, and it’s only a matter of time before it becomes unmasked.

Stats Show Spike in Deaths and Cases Come from Brazil and Mexico

It has now become apparent the spike in cases and certainly in deaths in the border states of Arizona, California and Texas closely parallel the rise in cases in Mexico. In addition, spikes in cases and deaths in Florida closely mimic the curves displayed for Brazil.

The Brazilian population in Florida counts more than 300,000, one of the largest Brazilian communities in the United States. And if you think the travel ban prevents Brazilians from entering the U.S., this document details the many exceptions to the rule.

Daily cases in Brazil via Worldometers.info

It is generally accepted that it takes approximately five days to get infected with coronavirus and for those who tragically succumb to the illness, which is a tiny percentage of all cases, it takes anywhere from 10 to 18 days to die. The peak cases in Mexico occurred in late July (at this point people may have had it for more than 10 days) and the peak of deaths in the U.S. border states of Arizona, California and Texas occurred in early August.

Daily cases in Mexico via Worldometers.info

Undoubtedly, there are delays in reporting due to slow data collection in Brazil and Mexico. In the United States, there are also delays in reporting cases and deaths.

People who cross the border or fly in from Brazil seeking medical attention are most likely already ill and desperate to receive premium U.S. healthcare at our fine hospitals.

When the cases were at a peak in Brazil and Mexico, you can assume those infected had been sick for at least several days or more than a week. If you get tested in Brazil or Mexico and the result is positive, it’s very likely you’ve had COVID-19 for a while. The chances that the very day you get tested align with the exact day you contract the virus are slim.

Now back to the numbers … the peaks of cases in Brazil and Mexico occurred the third week of July, and the peak deaths occurred in early August in Arizona, California and Texas. The curves in these states precisely mirror the curves in Brazil and Mexico, accounting for the lag between cases and deaths. This is not a coincidence, my friends. This is a very real example of The Politics of Duh.

Some people will say the rise in cases and deaths in these border states is due to the fact these states presumably opened up early – in late April and early May. But this isn’t true. Following the trajectory of infection and subsequent deaths, the rise would’ve appeared much sooner than the end of July.

Panic is unwarranted. Recently, cases have started dropping in both Brazil and Mexico, and because the situation is so closely tied to our border states, we’ve also seen significant drops in cases and deaths throughout Arizona, California, Florida and Texas as well.

There is an excellent short book by former New York Times reporter Alex Berenson in which he explains in great detail why lockdowns are ineffective against preventing the spread of COVID-19. Mr. Berenson provides well-researched scientific reasons based on data but he leaves out the 800-pound gorilla in the room: the politics of the coronavirus.

In January 2020, the unemployment rate stood at its lowest number in more than half a century. It would’ve been an extremely difficult feat to win an election against the President who created such a historically strong economy; there’s simply no arguing with numbers.

Let’s admit it, most people are concerned about the economy over almost anything else. Remember that wonderful saying, “It’s the economy stupid” coined in 1992 by Democratic Strategist James Carville? Well, it really is. Or it really was because coronavirus was able to infect and sicken one of the healthiest U.S. economies in our nation’s history.

There’s no doubt ill-advised lockdowns destroyed the economy and created unprecedented levels of unemployment, driving national discontent to soaring heights. This new concern about rising cases and a small amount of rising deaths in border states is another attempt to keep the economy locked down until the elections. There are basically four things Democratic governors can do to defeat Donald Trump in November:

  1. Keep the economy locked down to depress GDP numbers, making unemployment numbers artificially high in their states.
  2. Block schools from re-opening in September, which would inhibit parents from easily working, whether it’s at home or in the office.
  3. Create a situation where unemployment benefits are higher than the salaries of many who lost their jobs thereby providing no incentive for these unemployed workers to return to work.
  4. Encourage mail-in ballots due to the coronavirus, which can be replete with voter fraud and thus fraudulently can swing the election in the Democrats’ favor.

So far the governors of Arizona, Florida and Texas have resisted locking down their states again although California Governor Gavin Newsom has locked down most of his state. Governor Newsom’s actions to successfully shut down businesses once again, thwarting any growth from the semi-recovering economy, is just one more way Democratic politicians are using coronavirus as an effective strategy to defeat President Trump in November.

In his book, Mr. Berenson avoided any discussion about the politics of the coronavirus, which I understand, (keep to the facts) but in this particular situation, a no-politics treatise on the topic of COVID-19 is like corona without the virus – it misses the point. If anything has been proven by this entire coronavirus fiasco, it’s that in the real world, no matter how many times you present the scientific evidence, politics trumps science every time.

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