COVID-19

Let’s Talk about the UV Index and COVID-19

There’s a very interesting relationship between the UV index in a particular area and the mortality rate per million as it concerns COVID-19.

The CDC and NIH have not spoken about this as far as I know (or as far as an exhaustive internet search will tell me). When both organizations speak about their wildly inaccurate projections for this virus they only talk about mitigation efforts.

So far, there has been no real explanation as to why states like New York are seeing such different death rates from California, Florida and Texas. For more than a month, New York has practiced the most stringent mitigation efforts; in fact, once it was determined the virus could be transmitted by tiny droplets in the air, everyone was advised to wear a face mask. (Try entering a grocery store in Manhattan without one and you’ll realize how rigorously this measure has been followed.)

Did mandatory mask-wearing cause a drop in the virus’ progression? Who knows. What we do know is that New York remains at the epicenter of deaths resulting from COVID-19 in the United States.

As of today, New York has the highest mortality rate of 550 people per million, while California is at 20 deaths per million people. Similarly, Florida, which had a huge influx of Northerners – some presumably infected – stands at 28 deaths per million.

Elsewhere in the world, Singapore has a mortality rate of only two people per million, which is one of the lowest mortality rates worldwide. Now here’s where it gets interesting: In general, Singapore has a very high UV index but reached an extraordinary peak of 15 in February.

Brazil, as another example, kept its economy going. President Jair Bolsonaro of Brazil resisted an economic shutdown and death rates for COVID-19 in Brazil’s largest cities like Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo never approached New York City’s mortality level.

Now, excuse the bright and sunny colors for a decidedly sober subject but here’s a simple representation of UV Index from low to high, showing that 15, as Singapore clocked, is basically off the charts:

OK, back to our UV discussion. Many studies have shown that UV radiation at a certain level can indeed kill influenza-like viruses, of which the coronavirus would be contained within that category. The Center for Radiological Research at Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC) published the findings of a study conducted several years ago that showed the effectiveness of UV in killing viruses, especially airborne viruses. In the report, titled Can UV Light Fight the Spread of Influenza?, researchers said, “continuous low doses of far ultraviolet C (far-UVC) can kill airborne flu viruses without harming human tissues.”

Referencing the study, Dr. Michael Grosso, chief medical officer at Huntington Hospital in Huntington, N.Y., also told WebMD:

“The prospect of reducing the transmission of influenza and other respiratory viruses using far-UV radiation is very exciting.”

The CDC and thee NIH have enormous resources at their disposal. Between the two organizations, they boast more than 30,000 employees and 10,000+ CDC employees according to Forbes earn a collective $1.1 billion annually yet as far as I know, they never speak about or have further researched the relationship between the virus and Ultraviolet radiation. If their models took UV into consideration, maybe the curves would look completely different and be far more accurate. All they seem to care about is mitigation but mitigation as a predictive determinant of virus spread has proven time and time again to be unreliable.

Graphs showing the UV levels for various states during February and March are easy to find (and I’ll post a few below). With just a cursory glance, you can see there is a very, very obvious correlation between mortality rates and the level of UV radiation in various countries and states.

Invariably, the higher the UV index, the lower the mortality rate per million. Not only did the CDC mislead President Trump and caused the greatest economic shutdown in the world’s history but they also exhibited (and continue to exhibit) a level of incompetence that is simply mind-blowing.

If this relationship between UV levels and COVID-19 mortality holds up, it’s quite reasonable to think the virus will fade rapidly as the index goes up in May and June as summer approaches.

Perhaps the correlation was unintentionally overlooked or else deliberately overlooked but either way, it’s a crime.

Remember, the world relies on the WHO and the CDC and the Imperial College of London for most of the statistics provided during a pandemic. All three failed the world. But there is still an opportunity to right the wrongs. These facts should be taken into consideration as governments determine the states that should open with minimal risk to the general population. In addition, if this is true, the relationship should be used when creating future models of viral outbreaks to make sure they’re more accurate than the fake-news models we’ve been told to accept as truth. The only truth I see is in the cold, hard numbers, not in the rhetoric or in the irresponsibly tossed-around numbers – 200,000 deaths? UV index and its connection to viral spread is the very essence of the politics of duh.